Explore Chinese fashion during ‘Sumptuous Silks’ workshop

 SPECIAL GUEST INSTRUCTOR YUNRU SHEN MODELS ONE OF HER LATEST DESIGNS, A MODERN TAKE ON THE TRADITIONAL QIPAO (or CHEONGSAM) DRESS POPULAR IN CHINA AND THROUGHOUT THE WEST.  Shen explained of the concept behind her dress' design: "It is inspired by the beautiful musical tones of the Chinese ancient stringed instrument, the guzheng. I learned to play this instrument during my childhood. It has deep meaning for me. Musical tones are very similar to daily life — sometime we are up, sometime we are down. At end, it is our beautiful and meaningful life with happiness and pain."

SPECIAL GUEST INSTRUCTOR YUNRU SHEN MODELS ONE OF HER LATEST DESIGNS, A MODERN TAKE ON THE TRADITIONAL QIPAO (or CHEONGSAM) DRESS POPULAR IN CHINA AND THROUGHOUT THE WEST.

Shen explained of the concept behind her dress' design: "It is inspired by the beautiful musical tones of the Chinese ancient stringed instrument, the guzheng. I learned to play this instrument during my childhood. It has deep meaning for me. Musical tones are very similar to daily life — sometime we are up, sometime we are down. At end, it is our beautiful and meaningful life with happiness and pain."

The Arts & Science Center invites the community to explore traditional and modern Chinese fashion during its next adult education class, Sumptuous Silks and Ancient Traditions: Exploring Chinese Fashion,” on Thursday, Sept. 20, from 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Special guest Yunru Shen, fashion designer and instructor at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, and will lead an engaging discussion on traditional and modern Chinese fashion. Participants will then have their turn to be creative as ASC Public Programs Coordinator Leonor Colbert guides them through making their own hand fans. Inspired by a variety of traditional Chinese hand fan designs, the silk brocade fans can be personalized to the makers’ taste. Participants can also enjoy a complimentary wine or beer while making their fans.

No experience is required, and all materials will be included. Advance registration is required and attendees must be at least 21 years old. The cost is $10 for ASC members or $15 for nonmembers.

Shen, who is originally from Shanghai, China, is a faculty member in UAPB's Merchandising, Textiles, and Design Program.

“I will talk about Chinese fashion from the 1920s qipao dress to today though history and culture change,” Shen explained. “I will also discuss three fashion cities: Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong Kong in order to introduce today’s Chinese fashion trends with different major cities’ environmental influence.”

Shen will also show her own spring/summer 2019 collection.

“I created my newest fashion collection with new qipao style. It is a new Oriental/exotic American style,” she explained. She plans to wear the modern silk qipao dress for the event.

 "Sumptuous Silks and Ancient Traditions" Attendees will be guided in making their own personalized fans like the one shown. Inspired by a variety of traditional Chinese hand fan designs, the silk brocade fans can be personalized to the makers’ taste. They can also enjoy a complimentary wine or beer while making their fans.

"Sumptuous Silks and Ancient Traditions" Attendees will be guided in making their own personalized fans like the one shown. Inspired by a variety of traditional Chinese hand fan designs, the silk brocade fans can be personalized to the makers’ taste. They can also enjoy a complimentary wine or beer while making their fans.

The qipao (and the similar cheongsam) first became popular in 1920s Shanghai. Characterized by its close fit and brocade fabric, the dress style can still be seen in 21st-century eastern and western fashions.

Shen has studied and worked in fashion on three continents. She earned a Bachelor of Design degree in fashion and apparel design in 2010 at Raffles College of Design and Commerce in Sydney, Australia. She worked in Shanghai — China’s the fashion and economic center — at KISMET+, a women’s fashion studio. She moved to the United States in 2011 to study at the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia, where she graduated in 2014 with a Master of Fine Arts degree in apparel design. She has also worked in a design team for Edun Americas Inc., a New York City-based fashion brand founded to promote fair trade in Africa by sourcing production within the continent.

Shen joined UAPB in 2014, and teaches classes covering textiles, apparel design, fashion illustration, fashion buying and merchandising, and the fashion industry.

Tinkerfest 2018 Emphasizes Health with Maker-Centric Family Fun

 Visitors show off their pedal-art creations they made during Family FunDay on Aug. 11, 2018. Pedal-powered art is just one of the many activities planned during ASC's Tinkerfest 2018, to be held 1-3 p.m. Sept. 8.

Visitors show off their pedal-art creations they made during Family FunDay on Aug. 11, 2018. Pedal-powered art is just one of the many activities planned during ASC's Tinkerfest 2018, to be held 1-3 p.m. Sept. 8.

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Tinkerfest, the Arts & Science Center’s annual maker-centric festival, returns Saturday, Sept. 18, from 1-3 p.m. This year, we will explore the connections between the maker movement and health with a variety of fun and educational activities for the whole family. 

“We’re doing all kinds of different things that involve tapping into creativity while exploring physical fitness and nutrition,” said ASC Public Programs Coordinator Leonor Colbert

Admission to Tinkerfest and all activities are free.

Tinkerfest 2018 is sponsored by the Arkansas Art Council, Blue & You Foundation, the Discovery Network, and the Pine Bluff Area Community Foundation. ASC is partnering with the Pine Bluff Jefferson County Library System, Tour de Bluff, and the Museum of Discovery in Little Rock for the event.

Highlights of this year's activities include: A hands-on cooking workshop; pedal-power stations for visitors to create art, blend delicious smoothies, and see their muscles turn energy into light; “bike rodeo,” and Yoga for Kids.

Thanks to a grant from the Blue & You Foundation, special guest Faith Anaya of Kids Cook! (a nonprofit organization based in Little Rock) will lead a cooking workshop for young people ages 6-13.

“Kids will be able to get their hands on the food, and try some different skills that they would be using in the kitchen like cutting and cooking,” Colbert said. “And we’ll get to sample the recipe that they create.“ 

There will be two separate sessions — a 1 p.m. session for ages 6-9, and a 2 p.m. session for ages 10-13. Each class can accommodate up to 12 children. Participants must sign up at the event — first come, first serve.

Bicycling is a natural bridge between health and tinkering, and Tinkerfest 2018 features a plethora of fun pedal-related activities. 

Visitors can hop on one of the bikes to create a pedal-powered painting. How do you create art with a bike? The participant powers the bike, and through centrifugal force, paint “flings” outward from the center of the drum, creating a colorful swirling pattern. A sheet of paper is lowered into the floating paint to create a piece of art.

Visitors who bring their own bikes to Tinkerfest can create even more art. An attachment holding a large piece of chalk is connected to the back of a bike, and the visitor can pedal around to a draw vibrant patterns onto the asphalt.

At the bike power station, visitors can see how their pedaling generates electricity by using a bike connected to an LED tower.

Put together a variety of ingredients to create a unique smoothie recipe and blend it using the bike at the pedal-power smoothie station.

Volunteers from Tour de Bluff (Pine Bluff’s main annual bike event) will host a “bike rodeo,” or trick riding on BMX bikes. They’ll also share tips on bike safety, and how people in the area can get out and ride their bikes more.

Colbert will lead two Yoga for Kids sessions — one at 1:30 p.m. and another at 2:30 p.m. Each session has room for 12 participants. Participants must sign up at the event — first come, first serve. (These two sessions are in addition to ASC’s weekly Yoga for Kids class, held every Saturday from 10:15-11 a.m. Yoga for Kids is a Healthy Living program for children ages 6 and up.)

Visitors will even be able to play the classic video game “Donkey Kong” using bananas, lead by Museum of Discovery staff. The fruit is converted into a controller with a Makey Makey — a kit which turns ordinary objects into touchpads.

“It will be like playing a video game but instead of sitting down and controlling it with your thumbs, you’re controlling your character in Donkey Kong with your whole body — moving around, jumping, touching things,” Colbert explained.

In addition to the Tinkerfest activities, ASC’s current exhibitions will be open. They include: Interactive exhibit Imaginate! in the International Paper Gallery, Creative Construction Zone in the Simmons Gallery, Small but Mighty in the William H. Kennedy Jr. Gallery, UAPB & ASC: Five Decades of Collaboration in the Ben J. Altheimer Gallery, and Elsie Mistie Sterling: Pencil and Persistence in the Catherine M. Bellamy Theatre Hall.

TINKERFEST 2018 ACTIVITIES

(All activities take place between 1-3 p.m., unless otherwise specified)

Kids Cook! 
Location: ASC Studio
1 p.m. session: Ages 6-9 (up to 12 children)
2 p.m. session: Ages 10-13 (up to 12 children)
Location: Studio
Hands-on cooking class for kids.
Note: Participants must sign up. First come, first serve. 

Makey-Makey Donkey Kong
(with Museum of Discovery)

Location: Bellamy Theatre Stage
Play “Donkey Kong” using a banana and your whole body.

Yoga for Kids
Location: Dressing Room/Studio
1:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. (up to 12 children per session)
Location: Dressing Rooms
Ages 6 and up
Note: Participants must sign up. First come, first serve. 

Smoothie Station
Location: Catherine M. Bellamy Theatre Hall
Make your own smoothie using a bike-powered blender!

Tinkerfest Buttons and Take-and-Makes
Location: Simmons Gallery
Make a Tinkerfest 2018 button and do a health-inspired take-and-make activity.

Bike Rodeo (with Tour de Bluff)
Location: Front parking lot
Trick-riding demos from area cyclists.

Bike Art and Bike Power
Location: Front parking lot
Pedal-powered spin art, LED tower station.

 Special guest Faith Anaya of Kids Cook! (a nonprofit organization based in Little Rock) will lead a cooking workshop for young people ages 6-13.

Special guest Faith Anaya of Kids Cook! (a nonprofit organization based in Little Rock) will lead a cooking workshop for young people ages 6-13.

 An example of the groovy art created using pedal power!

An example of the groovy art created using pedal power!

Interdisciplinary Camp Immerses Middle-Schoolers in Swing, Jazz Era

 Special guest instructor Nick Davis of Eugene, Oregon, teaches jazz and swing dance moves during ASC's summer program "Swing, Art, and all that Jazz," held July 30-Aug. 1. The program — open to students in seventh, eighth, and ninth grades — was funded by a grant from the Arkansas Department of Education.

Special guest instructor Nick Davis of Eugene, Oregon, teaches jazz and swing dance moves during ASC's summer program "Swing, Art, and all that Jazz," held July 30-Aug. 1. The program — open to students in seventh, eighth, and ninth grades — was funded by a grant from the Arkansas Department of Education.

By Shannon Frazeur

Students were immersed in the jazz and swing culture of the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s during ASC’s recent “Swing, Art, and All That Jazz” summer program. The camp, held July 30-Aug. 3, introduced seventh-, eighth-, and ninth-graders to the dances, music, and culture of this period.

Although dance and music were central, the camp wasn’t all about performance. The camp also incorporated art, history, and culture of the era — particularly pertaining to African-Americans — along with videography, into a multidisciplinary program which culminated in a video the students shot and edited themselves.  

 "Untitled (Dancers)," Palmer C. Hayden, Watercolor and paper, 1927. From the Permanent Collection of the Arts & Science Center for Southeast Arkansas.

"Untitled (Dancers)," Palmer C. Hayden, Watercolor and paper, 1927. From the Permanent Collection of the Arts & Science Center for Southeast Arkansas.

The camp was made possible by a grant from the Arkansas Department of Education, through its Academic Enrichment for the Gifted/Talented in Summer (AEGIS) program. The AEGIS programs provide unique learning opportunities in specific areas for gifted students in Arkansas. “Swing, Art, and All That Jazz” was one of eight AEGIS programs funded for 2018. The camp was open to students in Arkansas at no cost to them.

ASC welcomed special guest instructor Nick Davis of Eugene, Oregon, for the week. Davis is founder of a nonprofit swing dance organization, Track Town Swing, in Eugene. He is also a Frankie Manning Ambassador with the Frankie Manning Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and instruction of traditional swing dancing. Davis has traveled nationally and internationally to teach and DJ at swing dance events.

Davis introduced the students to traditional swing and jazz dance routines such as the “Lindy Hop,” the “Shim Sham,” the “Charleston,” and “The Big Apple.”

A swing and jazz era painting from ASC’s Permanent Collection served as inspiration and a point of context for the class. Palmer C. Hayden’s 1927 watercolor “Untitled (Dancers)" depicts two African-American couples dancing with a swing and jazz band. Note: “Untitled” (Dancers) is on display now through Oct. 27 in ASC's William H. Kennedy Jr. Gallery.

Each morning, the students learned a new dance style or routine, and in the afternoon, they discussed it as a group and decided what was the most interested part of what they learned that day — both in terms of the dance and the contextual information that they learned about it, ASC Public Programs Coordinator Leonor Colbert explained.

The students then split into two groups. One group returned to the stage with Davis to perfect the final choreography and record themselves performing the dance moves they learned earlier that day. The second group created a script, providing interpretive context for that particular dance move. Then they audio recorded themselves reading the script. With the support of ASC Digital Media Specialist Ashley Smith, both groups came back together to edit the video and audio clips. By the end of the week, they had completed a 3-and-a-half minute video that not only demonstrates dance moves they learned, but provided interpretation about African-American dance history, especially related to the period most relevant for the 1927 Hayden painting.

The first day of camp also included an art and behind-the-scenes tour with ASC Curator Dr. Lenore Shoults. The tour provided context on visual art as a means of working through challenging ideas and some of the politics of representation, especially art depicting African-Americans, Colbert said.

The discussion continued Tuesday with guest speaker Jimmy Cunningham Jr., CEO of the Delta Rhythm ‘n’ Bayous Alliance and author of two books focusing on southeast Arkansas’ musical and arts cultural history and heritage. Cunningham, a Pine Bluff native, discussed regional connections between swing music, Delta blues, and hip-hop music. He also spoke on how music has always been a means of working through and expressing intense emotion.

“He was talking about music on the edge — ‘super black music,’ as he called it, and how that has changed over the years,” Colbert said. “What’s pushing the boundaries — there always has to be something new coming after it, but that idea has been continuous. So he had an intergenerational panel that had folks that were involved in various dance scenes, ranging from the 1950s to the 1990s, and they talked about the music, the cultural scene, what people were wearing and doing and talking about how they danced to that music. And then the kids got the chance to share a little of the music of what they are listening to now. So it was a really nice intergenerational exchange; that continuity, even though the music styles sound very different.”

The students also created individual works of visual art inspired by the pieces they saw during their curatorial tour. They could choose to either make a figurative work of art (like the Hayden watercolor) or a more abstract work of art.

“They’re identifying a discrete source of inspiration — whether it’s photo or a dance clip or a piece of music,” Colbert explained. “And they’re deciding on their media, which is either acrylic or watercolor or collage. So there is a lot of choice. There is a lot of learner-driven experience in this, where we’re not forcing them into pigeonholes in which they have to all do the same thing.”

Unlike many dance-based programs, there was no public performance.

“We are learning some routines that are from performances, but a lot of what they are learning are vernacular art forms or social art forms that are meant to be improvised or meant to be experienced with people and not on a stage in front of somebody. It loses a lot of the spontaneity that makes it special when you codify it in a package to be performed.”

Colbert, a longtime dancer herself, developed the curriculum and program proposal.

“It’s something that I’ve always really loved and appreciated its ability to bring very diverse people together. It’s just a very joyful, fun thing.”

Colbert also saw the potential for the program to introduce weightier topics.

“I particularly wanted to do this kind of camp that was focusing on interdisciplinary aspects, using dance and music as an entry point for larger conversations, especially as it relates to race, race representation, commodification of racial art and how it is consumed, and the power dynamics that come into play with African-American art forms,” she said. “Because in recent years, in the jazz and swing dance community nationally and internationally, there have been a growing momentum in the conversation about race and racism in the dance scene because it is a historically African-American art form, that is largely appropriated and performed by white people.

“So I felt that was something that was really important to a large community of artists, jazz dancers and jazz musicians, and I thought that the Arts & Science Center was uniquely well-positioned to start that conversation,” she said.

Nick Davis' ’Crazy Journey’

Nick Davis’ love for swing and jazz dance has taken him beyond the U.S. borders, as far away as Sweden.

His interest began in 1998 in Eugene after he started taking hip-hop and R&B dance classes. Those classes led him to other styles and, eventually, Lindy Hop swing.

“I found out that I really liked that kind of music,” he said.

Noticing his interest, his dance teacher told him there was a fellow teacher in town who specializes in swing. Denise Steele was a prominent teacher on the scene in the early 2000s, and would bring swing dance pioneer Frankie Manning to Oregon to teach workshops. Manning is widely considered the grandfather of Lindy Hop.

Although Manning was in his late 80s when Davis began taking class, he was still very active in the dance community and still teaching workshops.

“He would come to Oregon once or twice a year to pass on his wealth of knowledge to people. It was a pretty exciting time for me. So that helped me get connected to the dancing — not just to the dancing, but get connected to it from a cultural point.”

Davis connected to swing and jazz in a way that he didn’t with more contemporary dance and music styles.

“For me, I like hip-hop and all that stuff but it didn’t really resonate with me personally, and so hearing this style of music and this style of dance, to me, it felt much more elegant. It was something that was easier for me to get behind than just music that really, it paints a picture of more hardship than just kind of a lot of violence and a lot of things that I, personally, I understand but I’ve never really experienced. But with jazz, hearing more, getting more exposure to that, to me, it was more about songs about love and just trying to connect. And so I was like, OK, I feel this, this is resonating with me. So I was very happy to get connected to some swing dancing and jazz music.”

After the swing dance scene in Eugene faded, Davis returned to performing more contemporary jazz styles and hip-hop dance, he said. After Manning died in 2009 at age 94, Davis realized he wanted to return to the older dance styles.

“He definitely lived a good life, but that touched me to be like, ‘Oh, this person who I’ve been so inspired by is now no longer here — what does that mean for me?’” Davis said. “I was still dancing with my other group at the time but eventually the pull of ‘Let’s go back to swing dancing. Let’s try to connect with a person instead of just performing to seek attention, seek adulation.’ Getting back into social dance really helped me to feel like I was connecting with people on a more personal level.”

There still wasn’t much of a swing and jazz scene in Eugene but In 2012, Davis and a handful of other dancers began practicing together. Two or three people become 12 people, and when they held their first dance, 80 people showed up for what would become Track Town Swing. “So basically, I just put all my other dance stuff aside and focused on this ever since then.”

Davis was looking for ways to improve his teaching and applied for and was awarded the Frankie Manning Ambassador Scholarship, which included a three-week trip to Sweden, site of the world’s largest vernacular jazz dance camp.

“After that, I felt very inspired,” he said. From that opportunity, they were able to build up the scene in Eugene, and right now, Track Town Swing hosts five classes a week and regular dances.

Davis’ swing and jazz expertise goes beyond the dance floor. Although he still teaches quite a bit, he mostly works traveling as a DJ.

“For swing dance, what you want is to be able to have a live band play at your event,” he said. “It’s more fun, there’s a person there giving you something. You can’t always afford that, so obviously it’s really nice if you can get a person who is decent and knows enough about the music to rock the party by pressing play.”

Davis has worked as a DJ in the Pacific Northwest and Colorado. “And a few weeks ago, I was actually in Sweden as a DJ. So once again, we have this crazy situation where somehow I was able to get from Eugene, Oregon, to a village in Sweden where there is going to be hundreds of people staying up all night dancing, and I’m one of the people who is helping make that happen. It’s a crazy journey.”

King Foundation Grant to Expand ASC's Makerspace Theatre Program

 Students in the Arts & Science Center’s shadow puppet program shared the product of their work with family and friends May 23 during Family & Community Night at ASC. The evening was a culmination of a 12-week after-school theater program with students from the Boys & Girls Club. The program was facilitated by Leonor Colbert (above), ASC Public Program Coordinator, and Lindsey Collins, director for "Sister Act," ASC's summer musical. The King Foundation grant will help to support ASC's youth theatre-immersion program.

Students in the Arts & Science Center’s shadow puppet program shared the product of their work with family and friends May 23 during Family & Community Night at ASC. The evening was a culmination of a 12-week after-school theater program with students from the Boys & Girls Club. The program was facilitated by Leonor Colbert (above), ASC Public Program Coordinator, and Lindsey Collins, director for "Sister Act," ASC's summer musical. The King Foundation grant will help to support ASC's youth theatre-immersion program.

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The Arts & Science Center for Southeast Arkansas has received a grant of $35,000 from the Carl B. & Florence E. King Foundation in support of ASC's expanded youth theatre-immersion program, "The Stage," ASC Executive Director Dr. Rachel Miller announced June 13. "The Stage" is a makerspace for innovation and creativity through theatre.

 students in The Boys & Girls club get ready to show off their shadow puppetry for family and friends at ASC on May 23.

students in The Boys & Girls club get ready to show off their shadow puppetry for family and friends at ASC on May 23.

Building upon ASC’s established STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, ART, and Math) programming foundation, “The Stage” takes a holistic approach to theatre by engaging students in all aspects of theatre: directing, acting, playwriting, scenery construction, costume design, light and sound design, stage management, playbill design, and marketing and promotion of productions. All components are considered STEAM learning. By incorporating technology, students will learn coding and circuitry for scenery special effects, audio and film for documenting, and basic graphic design — all which ASC already provides through our programs.

Involving youth in community arts programs provides opportunity to cultivate civic engagement, which benefits the community at large; develop practical and personal skills considered instrumental in academic and career success, such as creative thinking, self-confidence, identity building, problem solving, collaboration, communication skills, and valuing constructive feedback, and ensures access to the arts for youth from low-income families who don’t possess the means to participate in programs in arts-resource rich regions of Arkansas.

ASC leverages funding from local and state grants, sponsorships, and foundations to provide half and full scholarships for “The Stage” summer program for ages 7-17. The all-day, month-long camp kicked off Monday, June 18, and culminates in an all-youth production of “It’s Not Ugly ... It’s Art!” on Friday, July 13, and Saturday, July 14.

In addition to the summer program, “The Stage” offers professional development workshops, internships, and free after-school theatre programming. This spring, Leonor Colbert, ASC Public Program Coordinator, and Lindsey Collins, director of ASC's summer musical production of "Sister Act," led the Boys & Girls Club 12-week shadow puppet program.

The King Foundation grant will assist the growth of ASC’s scope of community outreach through “The Stage” project. Starting this fall, programming will include an in-school component, a “digital” tool box for educators, and regional outreach.

ASC is immensely grateful for the King Foundation's support of our endeavors to provide access to the arts for everyone.

About the King Foundation

Carl B. and Florence E. King started the foundation that bears their names in 1966. Since then, the King Foundation has distributed more than $64 million to agencies operating in Texas and Arkansas while maintaining the legacies created by Carl “Big Jim” and Florence “Meemaw” King and their daughter, Dorothy.

Scholarships Available for Summer Camps

 Students create their own short films during the Arts & Science Center for Southeast Arkansas’ filmmaking camp in 2017. The 2018 filmmaking camp for ages 7-17 will be held July 16-20.

Students create their own short films during the Arts & Science Center for Southeast Arkansas’ filmmaking camp in 2017. The 2018 filmmaking camp for ages 7-17 will be held July 16-20.

By Shannon Frazeur

Children and teens have several options for fun and educational activities this summer at the Arts & Science Center for Southeast Arkansas. ASC is hosting a slate of camps for students ages 6 to 17 in art, engineering and technology, game design and development, theater, filmmaking, and even swing dance.

Through the generosity of the June and Edmond Freeman Endowment, Simmons First Foundation, Windgate Foundation, Ben J. Altheimer Foundation and Synergy Forum Inc., ASC can provide full and partial scholarships for students to attend this year's summer camps.

“We’re very fortunate this summer to have the support of the community and to be able to offer these scholarships,” said ASC Executive Director Dr. Rachel Miller.

The camps exemplify ASC’s mission to serve as a cultural crossroad: engaging, educating and entertaining through the arts and sciences. The camps’ curricula incorporates aspects of “STEAM” — science, technology, engineering, ART and math — through student-driven projects. The camps also help students to develop the “soft skills” needed to cultivate leadership and collaboration.

“The arts help to develop 21st century skills,” ASC Public Programs Coordinator Leonor Colbert explained. “Art helps prepare kids to be future leaders in many areas of their lives because it boosts problem-solving skills, empathy, being able to see problems from other people’s perspectives, and communication and collaboration.”

Colbert is leading the two visual art camps. Art I (ages 6-11) and Art II (ages 12-17) combine lessons in drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture with exploration of current ASC art exhibitions. Students will create 2D and 3D projects, and focus not only on artistic methods and working with different media, but also on the creative process itself.

“With the art camps, it’s more than just doing a bunch of art projects — we will also do activities each day to stretch their creativity muscles,” Colbert said. “The older students will be encouraged to explore the value of art in their own lives and what role art can play in their future success.”

ASC Digital Media Specialist Ashley Smith will lead the two STEAM camps, which are for ages 12-17.

Through hands-on building and experimentation, Engineering & Technology students will be introduced to electric circuits, LEDs and switches, stop-motion animation, beginning computer coding and apps, conductors and semiconductors, programming motors and app development.

Game Design & Development students will use virtual development to learn the fundamentals of creating a game through computer programming and animation, creative problem solving, mathematics, storytelling and teamwork.

Students can enroll in both half-day technology camps for a full day of STEAM learning and a discounted fee.

Justin Pike, Artistic Director for The Studio Theatre in Little Rock, is leading “The Stage” makerspace theater camp for ages 7-17.

The program takes a holistic approach to theater. Participants will sample all aspects of theater — including script writing, stage management, set design, light and sound design and costume design — as well as acting and directing. Incorporating technology, participating students will learn coding and circuitry for scenery special effects, audio and film for documenting, and basic graphic design to create a program for their production.

Their month of hard work will culminate in the production of a one-act play, Gary Ray Stapp’s “It’s Not Ugly ... It’s Art!” with public performances Friday, July 13, and Saturday, July 14.

“The students will have done everything in this play from the ground up,” Colbert said. “Each student will be making substantive creative contributions to the production.” The students will do everything needed to put on a production, including designing and building the sets and other jobs that do not necessarily include acting and directing but are equally important.

“They don’t always see themselves on center stage — but there are so many different ways that they can be a part of it,” Colbert said.

Eva Belle, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff Mass Communication instructor and debate coach, will lead the Filmmaking camp. Students ages 7-17 will explore storytelling as an art form, develop a film idea, shoot video, record audio and edit their creation. They will be immersed in both the technology and the creative and artistic aspects of filmmaking.

“The summer camp will be composed of educational and fun creative activities that we’re sure your child will enjoy,” Belle said. “They will learn the logistics of acting, storytelling and filming."

 Special guest instructor Nick Davis will lead the “Swing, Art and All That Jazz” camp. Interested students must apply to this camp. If selected, this camp is provided at no cost to the student. 

Special guest instructor Nick Davis will lead the “Swing, Art and All That Jazz” camp. Interested students must apply to this camp. If selected, this camp is provided at no cost to the student. 

In the “Swing, Art and All That Jazz” camp, made possible through a grant from the Arkansas Department of Education, students will explore the living traditions of swing dance and music. Students will learn a different style of swing dance each day of camp and produce a short video about the history of swing. Special guest instructor Nick Davis is an ambassador with the Frankie Manning Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and instruction of traditional swing dancing. Davis has traveled nationally and internationally to teach and DJ at swing dance events, and founded Track Town Swing Club.

This camp is for students in seventh, eighth and ninth grades during the 2017-18 school year. Participants do not need to be in gifted and talented programs at their school to apply. If selected, this camp is provided at no cost to the student.

For full descriptions and dates of the camps, please visit the summer camp webpageAdvance registration is required for all camps.

Scholarship eligibility is based on financial need, including household size and household income. The deadline for submitting scholarship applications for June camps is June 1, and July 1 for July camps. Parents are encouraged to submit applications as soon as possible.

Any questions about camps or scholarships may be directed to Leonor Colbert, ASC public programs coordinator, at 870-536-3375 or lcolbert@asc701.org.