2019 Rosenzweig Exhibition Accepting Entries from Mid-South Artists

Justin Bryant,  All the King's Men , watercolor triptych, 2015. Selected for inclusion in the 2015 Irene Rosenzweig Juried Exhibition, the piece is now in ASC's Permanent Collection.

Justin Bryant, All the King's Men, watercolor triptych, 2015. Selected for inclusion in the 2015 Irene Rosenzweig Juried Exhibition, the piece is now in ASC's Permanent Collection.

ASC’s Biennial Show Open to All Traditional Art forms; Cash Prizes Awarded

By Shannon Frazeur

The Arts & Science Center is accepting entries through August 25 for its biennial 2019 Irene Rosenzweig Juried Exhibition.

The Rosenzweig exhibition is open to artists in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. Artwork in all traditional forms including paintings, original prints, fiber art, ceramics, sculpture, and photography is accepted. (All components must be affixed—no separate parts. ASC cannot accept video, performance, or installation works.)

Carmen Castorena’s mixed media sculpture  One Too Many  was named Best in Show   of the 2017 Irene Rosenzweig Juried Exhibition.

Carmen Castorena’s mixed media sculpture One Too Many was named Best in Show of the 2017 Irene Rosenzweig Juried Exhibition.

The following prizes will be awarded:

  • Best in Show—$1000

  • First Place—$500

  • Second Place—$200

  • Three $100 Merit prizes

  • $2000 available in Purchase Awards.

Entries are accepted via email or mail. The deadline for digital submissions is midnight August 25.

For complete eligibility details, submission guidelines, and entry, visit the Rosenzweig exhibition webpage.

The prestigious exhibition — funded by an endowment by the notable Pine Bluff resident — is an opportunity for established and up-and-coming artist to gain recognition and earn prizes, and for ASC to grow its Permanent Collection.

“The reason why it’s important for us is it brings in artists from surrounding states,” said ASC Curator Dr. Lenore Shoults. “We’re able to find new artists, new approaches to art, and it’s always a very exciting exhibition.”

This year’s juror is Joseph Givens, a faculty member of Louisiana State University’s College of Art & Design.

“An advocate for marginalized artists, Joseph Givens specializes in the scholarly investigation of overlooked and neglected art movements,” according to his faculty bio.

Givens has a Master of Arts degree in art history from LSU.

The exhibition opens Thursday, October 10, with a public reception at 5 p.m. The exhibition will run through January 4, 2020.


 

Irene Rosenzweig’s Legacy

Irene Rosenzweig was born in Pine Bluff on July 26, 1903, to Pauline Sarason-Rosenzweig and William M. Rosenzweig. Her father — an immigrant from Lithuania — opened the Good Luck Store (later Rosenzweig’s Department Store) in Pine Bluff. It was the city’s largest mercantile and farm supply store.

Her family home, a Queen Anne Victorian-style at 717 W. Second Ave—now referred to as the Roth-Rosenzweig-Lambert House—was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

Rosenzweig, who graduated from high school first in her class in 1920, earned an undergraduate degree in classical studies from Washington University in St. Louis.

She earned a doctoral degree from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. The American Academy in Rome awarded Rosenzweig the 1930 Prix de Rome Fellowship in Classical Studies and Archaeology. During her time as a fellow in Rome, she advanced research for her dissertation—published in 1937 as Ritual and Cults of Pre-Roman Iguvium: With an Appendix Giving the Text of Iguvine Tablets.

Afterward, Rosenzweig tutored President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s family members during their time in the White House. Rosenzweig also taught Latin at the Madeira school, a private preparatory school for girls, in Virginia.

She was fluent in French, German, Spanish, Latin, and Greek.

Rosenzweig died at age 94 on October 8, 1997, in Pine Bluff. She left a gift to ASC, The Irene Rosenzweig Endowment Fund, Inc., which supports the exhibition in her name and includes purchase awards for the center’s Permanent Collection.

— From the Encyclopedia of Arkansas